Hobby Farms Editors
February 18, 2009

Can you help the Choctaw or Cherokee horse?

There are fewer than 200 horses and less than a dozen breeders. Committed owners and breeders are needed immediately.

According to the American Livestock Breeds Conservancy (ALBC), the primary breeding herd of Choctaws and Cherokees have suffered losses due to:

  1. The loss of access to over a million acres of timberland
  2. Lack of alternate grazing lands

The foundation herd is held by Bryan and Darlene Rickman in Oklahoma. The Rickmans have been stewards of this important breed for decades.

ALBC is working closely with the Rickmans to develop and implement an effective conservation breeding plan.

What do the Horses Need?
Six to ten breeders are needed to take on specific breeding groups of three to five horses, including a stallion.

  1. Individuals willing to become long-term stewards for these horses.
    Commitment should not be entered into lightly – this is an important genetic treasure that needs to be maintained. Only committed individuals, prepared to breed and promote these horses for decades, should consider acquiring breeding herds.

    People able to commit to this level of support must also be willing to see that these horses are passed to the next generation of stewards when the time comes for dispersal.

  2. Many horses need homes.
    There are a number of extra stallions that can be gelded and trained immediately, and many yearlings whose genetics are well-represented within the herd that will make fine riding horses after a couple years of growth. These horses may go to individuals looking for saddle horses. This is still a significant commitment, as horses are known to live 20-30 years.

    The horses are available at a reasonable cost, though you should also consider transportation costs in your planning.

  3. Other support-related efforts.
    For those unable to take on horses, ALBC welcomes your financial support for this and other rescue efforts.

About the Horses
Choctaw and Cherokee horses represent two unique strains of Colonial Spanish horses.

Choctaw and Cherokee horses are:

  • Known for their mild temperaments
  • Highly intelligent
  • Delightfully people-oriented
  • Have excellent feet and are surefooted and hearty

Who Should I Contact
If you are able and willing to help conserve Choctaws, please contact the ALBC office as soon as possible at:

ALBC
PO Box 477
Pittsboro, NC 27312
919-542-5704

albc@albc-usa.org

For more information about the horses, contact:

Bryant and Darlene Rickman
580-326-6005
Byrant cell: 580-743-1991

Sisty Monroe
sistymonroe@aol.com
580-326-8069


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