Krissa Finch
May 13, 2010
Giving back with Gardens

The Dinner Garden is stretching people’s food budgets by enabling them to grow their own food.

Victory gardens are making a comeback. Envisioning a nation where front lawns, empty lots, medians, parks, schools, churches and community centers devote space to fruit and vegetable gardens, Texas resident Holly Hirshberg established The Dinner Garden in 2009 to provide free seeds, supplies and advice to anyone who wants to start a garden.

Hirshberg began The Dinner Garden, a nonprofit, in response to the slow economy, and much like the victory gardens of the World Wars I and II, she wants these gardens to help people stretch their food budgets and enhance their nutritional intake. 

Since its beginning, The Dinner Garden has provided seeds to nearly 12,000 families in 39 states, but The Dinner Garden isn’t stopping with seeds. Hirshberg is seeking to expand the organization’s inventory to include inexpensive greenhouses for extending the growing season. Plus, volunteers are researching new plants and including recipes on the website so growers will have new ways to cook their produce.

Visit The Dinner Garden to assist in the organization’s efforts or learn more.

Filtered Under Urban Farming

Next Up