Elizabeth Adams
June 24, 2014
Patritoic Bushel Baskets - Photo courtesy Elizabeth Adams Troutman (HobbyFarms.com)
Courtesy Elizabeth Troutman Adams/Bluegrass Goodness

Dotting the front yard with miniature flags, decorating a float for the local parade or donning a tall Uncle Sam hat are all ways Americans will be celebrating the Fourth of July next week. How will you get in the patriotic spirit and celebrate our nation’s independence with your customers at the market?

There’s no need to paint your face red, white and blue to show a sense of national pride at the market, but acknowledgement of the holiday will make your business appear more festive. Expressing American allegiance will help you connect with customers who are stocking their kitchens with vegetables to serve alongside their prized Fourth of July barbecue.

Independence Day gestures can be simple, homemade and inexpensive to create.
We all know space is tight at your farm stand—and products take first priority over decorations, so take the functional route and decorate an item with a purpose.

Your customers will stop by to salute this patriotic bushel basket, but better yet, they’ll probably be eyeing the goods inside them. Stock your farm stand with a few of these cheerful baskets to tout your American spirit, or simply use them at home for a Fourth of July celebration centerpiece.

Supplies needed:

  • bushel basket (any size)
  • masking tape
  • red and white paint (preferably outdoor/patio paint)
  • small flat-tipped paintbrush (between 1 and 2 inches)
  • blue ribbon (Choose any size or decoration, though a star-print will mimic the American flag more precisely.)
  • glue gun

Step 1
Examine your bushel basket. There’s a pattern of wood slats that make up the exterior shape of the basket. You’re only going to paint the slats that are completely exposed, not those tucked beneath others and partially exposed. Once you establish the pattern visually, use masking tape to set off every other slat. These will be the white stripes on your basket.

Step 2
Paint two, thick coats of white on the exposed slats using your small paintbrush. Stroke downward with the brush, and avoid clumping the paint at the center rim wooden piece. Remove the masking tape and allow the basket to dry for a few hours.

Patritoic Bushel Baskets - Photo courtesy Elizabeth Adams Troutman (HobbyFarms.com)
Courtesy Elizabeth Troutman Adams/Bluegrass Goodness

Step 3
Use the masking tape to set off the remaining fully exposed slats. (If you have a steady hand, you might opt to forgo the tape this round.) Paint them red, and allow the basket to dry for a few more hours. It’s also a fun idea to paint the wood handle red, but it’s a little bit tricky as the handle will need to be propped up while drying!

Step 4
Once the paint has dried, apply the ribbon of your choice along the upper rim of the bushel basket. Measure the circumference of the mouth of your basket, and cut your piece of ribbon that length. Take this chance to touch up any paint smears that might have occurred along the way. Then, with a hot glue gun, paste the ribbon around the rim of the basket, tucking in the edges where they meet.

Step 5
Fill the basket with products you hope will vanish at the farmer’s market during or before the July Fourth weekend. Then use the baskets for your own fun decorating around the house by filling them with sunflowers, using them as tabletop breadbaskets or filling them with sparklers for the kids.

Patritoic Bushel Baskets - Photo courtesy Elizabeth Adams Troutman (HobbyFarms.com)
Courtesy Elizabeth Troutman Adams/Bluegrass Goodness

Find more summer crafts on HobbyFarms.com:

 

Elizabeth Troutman Adams at The Craft Hub
About Elizabeth Troutman Adams
Elizabeth Troutman Adams is a freelance writer, public-relations specialist and blogger based in Lexington, Ky. When she’s not churning out words, she loves dabbling in the kitchen, riding and jumping horses, improving her home with her own hands, and bringing people together with the sentiment of old-fashioned hospitality. Look for her DIY marketing projects each month on The Craft Hub, and get to know her better at Bluegrass Goodness.

 

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