Chamomile

Chamomile

What we know as chamomile is technically two different plants — German chamomile (Matricara recutita) and Roman (or English) chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile) — with many similarities including gray-green, feathery leaves; tiny, daisy-like flowers; and a pleasing, apple scent. Both types of chamomile are relatives of the daisy family and have been used to aid in digestion, calm frazzled nerves, alleviate menstrual cramps and soothe some skin conditions. It’s thought that the Roman chamomile is also able to reduce some kinds of inflammation. Whether you grow German or Roman chamomile, either will make a soothing cup of tea, herbal bath or steam facial.

Calendula

Calendula

Offering a near-continuous run of cheerful, golden flowers, calendulas (Calendula officinalis), or pot marigolds, are a very hardy herb. This Mediterranean native is a annual from the Asteraceae family. Once used as an all-purpose tonic, calendula flowers really made the rounds in the kitchens of England and parts of Europe; the Romans even relied on calendula to treat scorpion bites. Less popular now, calendula makes a pretty addition to the herb garden and its petals can be used to create a striking yellow dye. Calendula’s dried flowers are sometimes still used in topical ointments for burns, cuts and minor skin irritations; a few handfuls of calendula petals can make for an energizing, herbal bath.

Oyster mushroom profitable

Oyster Mushrooms

Oyster mushrooms are the most widely eaten mushrooms in the world and very easy to grow. Their oyster-like flavor makes them great in soups.

Azuki beans

Azukis Beans

Azuki beans are traditionally used as paste in Japanese desserts, but they can be grown here in the U.S. and used in many other dishes as well.

Black-eyed Peas

Black-Eyed Peas

The black-eyed pea is hard-to-miss with its pale body and small, black “eye.” Traditionally, in the United States, it’s used in Southern dishes.

Red Onion

Red Onions

These mild-flavored onions are a little bit sweeter than white onions. They are great on salads and sandwiches.

White Onion

White Onions

Not only are pungent white onions great for grilling and sautéeing, they can also be used as an insect repellent for your garden.

Sweet Potato

Sweet Potato

Packed with nutrients, sweet potatoes are a staple food all over the world. In the United States, they are usually made into a sweet pie for Thanksgiving Day.

Russet Burbank potatoes

Russet Burbank Potato

The Russet Burbank potato is what Idaho is known for. This potato is commonly used at fast-food restaurants for French fries, but because of the higher sugar content, it’s great for simply baking and topping off with butter.

Yukon Gold

Yukon Gold Potato

Great for mashing or boiling, the sweet Yukon Gold potato stands up to high heat when cooking.