Dill

Dill

Dill flowers are attractive to many species of beneficial insects, making it a good choice for all gardens. Dill is used in pickling and making “dilly beans” and is excellent with roasted potatoes and vegetables.

Sage

Sage

Culinary sage (Salvia officinalis) has a perfume-like fragrance and flavor, and it produces lovely blue flower spikes in midsummer. Use it in poultry, stuffings and vegetable dishes. Tri-colored sage looks beautiful in containers and tastes great, though its flavor is a bit stronger than standard sage.

Arugula

Arugula

Arugula’s spicy, peppery flavor is distinctive. The leaves are elongated with irregular margins and look beautiful in a salad mix. Harvest arugula frequently to increase the production of fresh, new foliage.

Bok Choy

Bok Choy

An Asian green with sweet, mild flavor, young bok choy leaves can be eaten fresh in salads while mature leaves can be steamed, sautéed or stir-fried. Cultivars tolerant of heat are best for warmer climates, as they are more bolt-resistant.

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

This wonderful, underused vegetable can be eaten raw in a salad or used in stir-fries or soups.

Cantaloupe

Cantaloupe

There are dozens of cantaloupe varieties on today’s market. Choose a variety best suited to your climate. Urban growers may want to choose a fast-maturing variety like Fastbreak or Lil Loupe, which also take a little less space.

Watermelon

Watermelon

Homegrown watermelons are as sweet as you can get. Smaller-fruited varieties like Petite Treat and Sugar Baby are good choices for smaller households. Yellow-flesh varieties have a sweet, mellow flavor and are good for gardeners wanting to try something different.

Zucchini

Zucchini

Zucchini, also known as summer squash, comes in many varieties, including the standard long green types and yellow crooknecks. For something different, plant round varieties like Eight Ball or scallopini types for added interest and flavor.

Cherokee Purple

Cherokee Purple Tomato

The Cherokee Purple tomato is said have originated more than 100 years ago with the Cherokee people. This beefsteak-type fruit is deep purple with green shoulders, is densely textured and has a mild, sweet tomato flavor. Because it is an open-pollinated heirloom variety, seeds are easily saved from year to year and return true to type.

Kellogg’s Breakfast Tomato

The fruits of Kellogg’s Breakfast are a brilliant orange and have a tangy flavor. They are thin-skinned and meaty with very few seeds. This tomato variety is the favorite of many gardeners. An open-pollinated heirloom, it hails originally from West Virginia, but was acquired by a Michigan breeder named Darrell Kellogg. Plants must be properly trellised or staked as the fruits are very heavy and the vines alone cannot support them.